ACADEMIC BOOKS

UNDERSTANDING THE SOCIAL ECONOMY: A Canadian Perspective
(2nd Edition)

Jack Quarter, Laurie Mook,

& Ann Armstrong  2018

ABOUT

Suitable for courses addressing community economic development, non-profit organizations, co-operatives and the social economy more broadly, the second edition of Understanding the Social Economy expands on the authors’ ground-breaking examination of organizations founded on a social mission – social enterprises, non-profits, co-operatives, credit unions, and community development organizations.

 

While the role of the private and public sectors are very much in the public light, the social economy is often taken for granted. However, try to imagine a society without the many forms of organizations that form the social economy: social service organizations, arts and recreation organizations, ethno-cultural associations, social clubs, self-help groups, universities and colleges, hospitals and other healthcare providers, foundations, housing co-operatives, or credit unions. Not only do these organizations provide valuable services, but they employ many people, and purchase goods and services. They are both social and economic entities. Understanding the Social Economy illustrates how organizations in the social economy interact with the other sectors of the economy and highlights the important social infrastructure that these organizations create. 

 

The second edition contains six new case studies as well three new chapters addressing leadership and strategic management, and human resources management. A much-needed work on an important but neglected facet of organizational studies, Understanding the Social Economy continues to be an invaluable resource for the classroom and for participants working in the social sector.

UNDERSTANDING THE SOCIAL ECONOMY OF THE UNITED STATES

Laurie Mook, John Whitman, Jack Quarter, & Ann Armstrong  2015

ABOUT

Understanding the Social Economy of the United States is a comprehensive introduction to the operation and study of organizations with social goals – public sector nonprofits, civil society organizations, social enterprises, cooperatives and other organizations with a social mission – under the rubric of the social economy.

This text is rich in examples and case studies that explain the social economy framework in the context of the United States. The book not only highlights the differences between these organizations and traditional businesses, but also provides applied chapters on organizational development, strategic management and leadership, human resources, finance, and social accounting and accountability in social economy organizations.

The perfect introduction to the social economy framework for students of nonprofit management, business, social entrepreneurship, and public policy, Understanding the Social Economy of the United States an invaluable resource for the classroom and for practitioners working in the social economy sector.

SOCIAL PURPOSE ENTERPRISES: Case Studies for Social Change

Jack Quarter, Sherida Ryan, & Andrea Chan  2015

ABOUT

Social Purpose Enterprises: Case Studies for Social Change presents case studies of twelve organizations that operate in a growing niche within the Canadian social economy: market-based entities supported by a nonprofit organization and operated for the benefit of a workforce who lives on the margins of society.

Using a variety of research methods, the contributors examine the work of social purpose enterprises in a range of businesses including food services, child care, furniture, courier services, and microfinance. Combining the experience of academics and practitioners, each chapter analyses the economic, social, and policy implications of the case.

Building on research published in Researching the Social Economy (2010) and Businesses with a Difference (2013), Social Purpose Enterprises provides a valuable resource for those involved in the growing push to encourage market-based solutions for those on the social margins.

BUSINESSES WITH A DIFFERENCE: Balancing the Economic and Social

Laurie Mook, Jack Quarter, & Sherida Ryan  2012

ABOUT

Market-based social economy firms such as social enterprises, social purpose businesses, co-operatives, credit unions, and community economic development corporations aim to meet distinct social needs while making money. Do these types of businesses have the potential for growth in the modern economy? Are they destined to function only in areas where conventional firms cannot achieve a sufficient rate of return? Or will the role of social economy organizations change as businesses begin placing more emphasis on corporate social responsibility?

 

Building on the popular 2010 collection Researching the Social Economy, Businesses with a Difference explores the challenges and opportunities faced by firms that seek a genuine balance between their social and economic objectives. Through international case studies, including comparative analyses, this innovative collection highlights the unique issues that must be addressed when associations are accountable not to investors and shareholders, but instead to ordinary people.

RESEARCHING THE SOCIAL ECONOMY

Laurie Mook, Jack Quarter, & Sherida Ryan  2010

ABOUT

Researching the Social Economy is one of the first comprehensive research collections on the social economy in Canada. While the term "social economy" is used widely is Western Europe and Quebec, it has had minimal currency in English Canada, where the differences between the public and private sectors and among nonprofits, co-operatives, social enterprises, and community economic development organizations have been emphasized.

 

The contributions to this volume, flowing from an inter-regional and international network of scholars and community organizations, analyze how the social economy, in its many manifestations, interacts with and shares commonalities with organizations in the other sectors of the economy. Taken as a whole, Researching the Social Economy enriches our understanding of how this important cluster of organizations contributes to Canadian society in both economic and social terms, and lays the groundwork for future study.

UNDERSTANDING THE SOCIAL ECONOMY: A Canadian Perspective

Jack Quarter, Laurie Mook,

Ann Armstrong  2009

ABOUT

Suitable for courses addressing community economic development, non-profit organizations, co-operatives and the social economy more broadly, the second edition of Understanding the Social Economy expands on the authors’ ground-breaking examination of organizations founded on a social mission – social enterprises, non-profits, co-operatives, credit unions, and community development organizations.

 

While the role of the private and public sectors are very much in the public light, the social economy is often taken for granted. However, try to imagine a society without the many forms of organizations that form the social economy: social service organizations, arts and recreation organizations, ethno-cultural associations, social clubs, self-help groups, universities and colleges, hospitals and other healthcare providers, foundations, housing co-operatives, or credit unions. Not only do these organizations provide valuable services, but they employ many people, and purchase goods and services. They are both social and economic entities. Understanding the Social Economy illustrates how organizations in the social economy interact with the other sectors of the economy and highlights the important social infrastructure that these organizations create. 

PENSIONS AT WORK:  Socially Responsible Investment of Union-Based Pension Funds 

Jack Quarter, Isla Carmichael, & Sherida Ryan  2008

ABOUT

Pension funds have come to play an increasingly important role within the new economy. According to Statistics Canada, in 2006, trusteed pension funds in Canada had $836 billion of assets and represented the savings of 4.6 million Canadian workers. Pensions at Work is a unique collection of papers that uses a labour perspective to deal with the socially responsible investment of pension funds. Featuring leading Canadian and international scholars, it builds on existing scholarship on socially responsible investment and on the growing interest of the Canadian labour movement in joint trusteeship.

What is unique about this collection is that it synthesizes three distinct themes - socially responsible investment, pension funds, and labour studies. The contributors address an array of critical issues such as gaps in the education of union trustees of pension funds, the impact of human capital criteria on shareholder returns, the influence of corporate engagement upon corporate performance, and the nature of public-private partnerships (PPPs). Although the essays in Pensions at Work all address the nexus between socially responsible investment, pension funds, and unions, each looks at a particular manifestation of that relationship through a different disciplinary lens. This collection moves the discussion to pension funds in which union representatives are also trustees, a relatively new approach that will be of great interest to institutional investors, the labour movement, and instructors in labour studies programs.

WHAT COUNTS: Social Accounting for Non–Profits and Co-Operatives
(2nd Edition)

Laurie Mook, Jack Quarter, & 

Betty Jane Richmond  2007

ABOUT

Touted by many sector leaders worldwide, this book goes beyond traditional accounting to tell the story of nonprofit and cooperative performance. How do nonprofit organizations add value to communities? How can they create social capital out of the money invested in them? Can nonprofits and cooperatives measure their social performance and make their business case? How can nonprofits justify the public's trust in them? How can nonprofits measure their outputs with more accuracy? "What Counts" answers all these questions and more. The book will appeal to: Nonprofit and Cooperative Managers, Members, Staff and Boards; Volunteer Coordinators; Government Funders, Donors, Foundations; Social Researchers and Policy-Makers; and, Instructors in Nonprofit Management, Business, Public Administration, Community Development, Cooperative Studies, and Accounting.

WHAT COUNTS: Social Accounting for Non–Profits and Co-Operatives

Jack Quarter, Laurie Mook, & 

Betty Jane Richmond  2003

ABOUT

Touted by many sector leaders worldwide, this book goes beyond traditional accounting to tell the story of nonprofit and cooperative performance. How do nonprofit organizations add value to communities? How can they create social capital out of the money invested in them? Can nonprofits and cooperatives measure their social performance and make their business case? How can nonprofits justify the public's trust in them? How can nonprofits measure their outputs with more accuracy? "What Counts" answers all these questions and more. The book will appeal to: Nonprofit and Cooperative Managers, Members, Staff and Boards; Volunteer Coordinators; Government Funders, Donors, Foundations; Social Researchers and Policy-Makers; and, Instructors in Nonprofit Management, Business, Public Administration, Community Development, Cooperative Studies, and Accounting.

MONEY ON THE LINE:  Workers' Capital in Canada

Isla Carmichael & Jack Quarter  2003

ABOUT

The billions of dollars in Canadian pension funds belong to the workers for whom these funds were established. The money, in effect, is their "deferred wages," but, even though these vast sums now constitute the largest source of capital in the country, it has only been in the past few decades that workers, through their unions, have started to play a role in how, when, and where their pension money is invested.

This informative and fact-filled book examines the growing involvement of labour organizations in the management--and more often the co-management--of pension funds. It looks at the duties and rights of union trustees on pension boards, at their "fiduciary responsibilities," and more. 

BEYOND THE BOTTOM LINE: Socially Innovative Business Owners

Jack Quarter  2000

ABOUT

Quarter examines business owners who use their firms as laboratories for social innovation. After providing an introduction to this phenomenon in an historical perspective and discussing the 19th-century British industrialist Robert Owen, he provides ll case studies of contemporary innovators from six countries-the UK, US, the Netherlands, Germany, Canada, and New Zealand.

 

The case studies fall into two broad groups. The first involves business people who promote innovative ownership and decision-making strategies such as donating their shares to a trust and thereby creating a company without shareholders so that employees can assume greater control; creating a worker co-operative; and transferring ownership to employees through an employee stock ownership plan. The second group of case studies involves innovative efforts at changing the relationship to the surrounding community through creating socially and environmentally responsible businesses. Quarter concludes by looking at the potential and limitations of this phenomenon for building a social movement. A provocative look at the social organization of work that will be of interest to scholars and researchers of industrial organization and to business leaders examining innovative ownership arrangements.

CRISIS IN THE ISRAELI KIBBUTZ: Meeting the Challenge of Changing Times

Uriel Leviatan, Hugh Oliver, &

Jack Quarter  1998

ABOUT

Within the last decade, the kibbutzim of Israel have experienced a fundamental transformation that poses challenges to their values of collectivism and solidarity. This collection by leading scholars of the kibbutz not only updates knowledge of this innovative society, but also draws parallels to changes occurring in the West.

 

Kibbutz society is currently experiencing major change. Economic crises that erupted ten years ago have transferred into major social and ideological crises. The underlying debate is about what values should govern kibbutzim, as collectivism and altruism clash with individual and egocentric values in offering policies and directions for the future of the kibbutz society. An important result of the changes is the irrelevance of much past research about kibbutzim. This book updates that research.

With chapters by leading scholars of the kibbutz, this book not only updates knowledge of this innovative society, but also draws parallels to changes occurring in the West. This collection will be of particular interest to scholars and researchers of the kibbutz and the cooperative phenomenon, and those interested in alternative approaches to aging, education, management, and women's studies.

BUILDING A COMMUNITY-CONTROLLED ECONOMY: The Evangeline Co-Operative Experience

Paul Wilkinson & Jack Quarter

1996

This case study focuses on and analyses the formation of four co-operatives in the Evangeline region, a small Acadian community in the southwest part of Prince Edward Island.

 

Defined by the authors as an 'integrated community-controlled economy,' the Evangeline community demonstrates the potential that a network of interrelated co-operatives has for community economic development. More specifically, the authors discuss why some co-operatives succeed while others fail, and propose a model that outlines the element necessary for any comprehensive community economic-development process.

 

Wilkinson and Quarter look at the Evangeline experiment in the context of two seemingly contradictory trends today: globalization and decentralization. They argue that the initiatives undertaken by the Evangeline community fit within the trend toward decentralization and community control. The citizens of the Evangeline region have formed a community-controlled economy, refusing to accept the conventional wisdom that a small community is not viable in a modern economy. The authors suggest that the Evangeline experiment shows that communities which are being marginalized in the modern world can take matters into their own hands and succeed where externally driven development has failed.

CROSSING THE LINE: Unionized Employee Ownership and Investment Funds

Jack Quarter  1995

ABOUT

The line that divides management and labour is being crossed regularly in Canada, as workers become owners of the companies that employ them. This is the first book to examine this phenomenon.

Workers own a variety of enterprises small and large, often taking on an ownership role when their companies are in financial difficulty. Unions frequently provide the structure for workers to negotiate their ownership claims, but unions are ambivalent about these buyouts. Nevertheless, union-based and government-subsidized investment funds have rapidly growing resources to finance these takeovers.

Crossing the Line is a groundbreaking look at the controversial phenomenon of employee ownership.

CANADA'S SOCIAL ECONOMY: Co-Operatives, Non–Profits and Other Community Enterprises

Jack Quarter  1992

ABOUT

The Canadian economy is generally characterized by private enterprise with a small degree of government ownership. But what about organisations like Children's Aid or the Canadian Red Cross? Where do educational and religious organisations, arts groups, social housing, and non-profit daycare fit in?

This book is an up-to-date and comprehensive description of this important and growing "third sector" of the Canadian economy. Jack Quarter describes the key components of this sector, focusing on new approaches to ownership and management that go beyond traditional ideas about how businesses should be owned and run. He discusses new ways of managing social services like childcare and healthcare and looks at new forms of ownership that depart from the traditional public, private, and co-operative structures.

Canada's Social Economy offers a refreshing re-examination of the changing nature of the Canadian economy.

PARTNERS IN ENTERPRISE: Worker–Ownership in Canada

Jack Quarter & George Melnyk  1989

ABOUT

The current interest in new forms of ownership of the economy stems from

a number of sources: the prevention of plant shutdowns through worker

buyouts; unacceptably high levels of unemployment that have spurred interest

in job-creating alternatives; the desire by more highly educated workers for self

expression and democratic control over their work; successful models of

alternative economic organization around the world, and the perception by

conventional business that giving workers a piece of the pie' will lead to

increased productivity.

 

The inability of established economic organizations to meet even traditional

needs, such as secure employment and new needs such as economic democracy, has led to the belief that worker ownership is an idea whose time has come.

 

This book provides a readable account of some of the experiments in

economic democracy. Organized around a series of case studies selected

because of their unique circumstances, they range from buyouts of either

successful or failed firms to fresh starts. The presentation is balanced by region

across Canada and includes a variety of different businesses such as forestry,

fishing, printing, and retail.

MUST SCHOOLS FAIL?:
The Growing Debate in Canadian Education

Niall Byrne & Jack Quarter 1972

ABOUT

THE STUDENT MOVEMENT OF THE '60s

Jack Quarter  1972

ABOUT